Too Young to Wed: The Secret World of Child Brides

author Pulitzer Center   7 год. назад
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When American girls are forced into marriage abroad, the U.S. can do little to rescue them

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In India, young women sent into marriages far from home

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Asmah's Story: Too Young for Marriage | A Syrian Refugee in Turkey Films Her Life

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Child Marriage And Rape Is Still Legal In Yemen (2013)

The Youngest Bride (2013): The story of Nujood Ali, a young girl married off at 8 then raped and beaten by her husband, shocked the international community. But child marriage remains a legal and common practise in Yemen. For similar stories, see: Child Prostitution Is A Huge Problem In Madagascar https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ch3DPlf_JrE The Pakistani Woman Who Spoke out about Her Gang-Rape Sentence https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6yEgmf9XknI The Rampant Rape in the DRC That Continued despite UN Peacekeeping Efforts https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S9UZ1-xJ1B8 Subscribe to journeyman for daily uploads: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=journeymanpictures For downloads and more information visit: http://www.journeyman.tv/film/5951/the-youngest-bride Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/journeymanpictures Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/JourneymanVOD https://twitter.com/JourneymanNews Follow us on Instagram: https://instagram.com/journeymanpictures "He sexually assaulted me on the wedding night. His mother was holding me," remembers Nujood. Traumatised, she sought refuge from her relatives but was turned away for fear of shaming the family. With no one to rely on but herself, she took a taxi to court where a judge, outraged by her story, granted her a divorce. But Nujood was lucky in a country which does not recognise marital rape as a crime and has no minimum marriage age. A reform to introduce it was blocked last year by Yemen's Muslim Brotherhood. "Islam doesn't specify an age for marriage. Why make a problem out of nothing?" asks one member of Yemen's parliament. Nujood is set on fighting child marriage in Yemen when she grows up; but with an estimated half of all brides aged below 18 and many families hoping to alleviate poverty with dowries, she faces a bitter struggle. SBS Australia – Ref. 5951 Journeyman Pictures is your independent source for the world's most powerful films, exploring the burning issues of today. We represent stories from the world's top producers, with brand new content coming in all the time. On our channel you'll find outstanding and controversial journalism covering any global subject you can imagine wanting to know about.

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Every year, throughout the world, millions of young girls are forced into marriage. Child marriage is outlawed in many countries and international agreements forbid the practice yet this tradition still spans continents, language, religion and caste.

Over an eight-year period, photographer Stephanie Sinclair has investigated the phenomenon of child marriage in India, Yemen, Afghanistan, Nepal and Ethiopia. Her multimedia presentation, produced in association with National Geographic, synthesizes this body of work into a call to action.

Stephanie Sinclair's images are featured in a story on child marriage in the June 2011 issue of National Geographic magazine.

How to help: National Geographic has compiled a list of organizations that encourage families to delay marriage and give girls an opportunity to reach their full potential.

In a related post Stephanie Sinclair shares the difficult experiences child brides face. She discusses the need for their voices to be heard and the challenges she faced as a journalist who witnessed their struggles and abuse.

Learn more: http://pulitzercenter.org/articles/child-marriage-brides-too-young-to-wed-afghanistan-ethiopia-india-yemen

Teachers can download a free lesson plan to support classroom instruction on this presentation: http://pulitzercenter.org/builder/lesson/too-young-wed-secret-world-child-brides-documentary-screening-and-discussion-24316

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